Category Archives: COVID-19

Education

COVID-19 Webinars

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Covid 19 Education | Nutricia Adult Healthcare

Webinar 1: Nutritional management of COVID-19 patients who are critically ill

In this webinar, Dr Emma Ridley presents the latest ANZ and global evidence & guidelines for the nutritional management of critically and acutely unwell patients with COVID-19

Speaker Bios

Dr Emma Ridley is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANZIC-RC, Monash University where she leads the Nutrition Program and a Senior Clinical Dietitian in ICU at The Alfred Hospital. Completing her PhD in 2018, current research interests include understanding the optimum way to determine energy requirements in the critically ill, including the clinical application of indirect calorimetry, as well as the effect of optimal nutrition delivery on short and long-term outcomes in ICU patients. In 2019 Emma was named as a Finalist in the ‘Clinical Research’ category of the Premier’s Awards for Health and Medical Research for the work and outcomes within her PhD. Emma regularly delivers invited national and international presentations, is an Editor with Australian Critical Care and has authored 43 peer-reviewed publications, (including in the New England Journal of Medicine). Emma has been a named investigator on $6.3 million dollars of research funding with the teams she collaborates with and is the CIA on the INTENT trial that is investigating a whole hospital nutrition intervention in critically ill patients (NCT03292237).

Webinar 2: Nutrition support in patients with severe respiratory disease: from hospital to home

In this webinar, Dr Peter Collins presents on best practice recommendations for the optimal nutritional management of patients with severe respiratory disease and diagnosed, or are at-risk of, malnutrition.

Speaker Bios

Dr Peter Collins is a Senior Lecturer in Nutrition & Dietetics in the School of Allied Health Sciences at Griffith University. He is a Registered Dietitian with the UK Health Care & Professions Council and is a Registered Dietitian with the Dietitians Association of Australia with a PhD in Clinical Nutrition from the Faculty of Medicine at The University of Southampton. His research focuses on the detection and management of disease-related malnutrition in individuals with respiratory disease and he is a member of the Patient-Centred Health Services research group at Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Australia, where he is interested in the potential for innovative solutions to improve malnutrition treatment. Peter is passionate about the importance of community dietetics and the leading role dietitians can play in the delivery of evidence-based nutrition support.Peter is on the editorial board of the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, is an Early Career Faculty member of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and is leading the development of the new ESPEN guideline on clinical nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Webinar 3: Managing the nutrition support of COVID-19 patients in ICU

In this webinar, Dr Arthur van Zanten, Elisabeth De Waele and Paul Wischmeyer present and discuss current experience and best practice in ICU in the nutritional management of patients with COVID-19.

Speaker Bios

DR. ARTHUR R.H. VAN ZANTENChair of the Department of Intensive Care, Gelderse Vallei Hospital, Ede, The NetherlandsPROF. ELISABETH DE WAELEHead of Clinics ICU Head of Clinical Nutrition Department, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, BelgiumPROF. PAUL E. WISCHMEYERProfessor of Anesthesiology and Surgery with Tenure, Director-Perioperative Research, Duke Clinical Research Institute.

Webinar 4: Strategies for the nutritional management of COVID-19 post-ICU

In this webinar, Dr Arthur van Zanten, Elisabeth De Waele and Paul Wischmeyer present and discuss current experience, emerging research and nutritional considerations post ICU discharge for patients with COVID-19.

Speaker Bios

DR. ARTHUR R.H. VAN ZANTENChair of the Department of Intensive Care, Gelderse Vallei Hospital, Ede, The NetherlandsPROF. ELISABETH DE WAELEHead of Clinics ICU Head of Clinical Nutrition Department, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, BelgiumPROF. PAUL E. WISCHMEYERProfessor of Anesthesiology and Surgery with Tenure, Director-Perioperative Research, Duke Clinical Research Institute.

Useful Resources

Useful Resources

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Covid 19 Useful Resources | Nutricia Adult Healthcare

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

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Covid 19 FAQS | Nutricia Adult Healthcare

General FAQs

I am feeling well, but I want to see my mother/father at their home, what should I do?

It is important to follow protocols that have been set in your local state or territory. These may change day by day. Please check them on a regular basis, especially if you are in contact with those who are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, such as elderly people. If your parents have an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, due to their age or their health condition then where possible, connect with them through internet, Skype or phone and remind them that this is a temporary situation to protect them because they are important to you. Think about ways to keep in touch regularly and ensure that your parents have a means to contact you. If you are visiting an older relative for an essential purpose, you should keep a safe distance, preferably at least 1.5 metres apart, no kissing, hugging or handshakes, and wash your hands well and often, using sanitizer gel when it is not possible to wash.

Can I take my mother (70 years old) out for a walk?

Older adults should take precautions to reduce risk of exposure to the virus. This includes limiting unnecessary exposure to other people, poorly ventilated areas, and ensuring enough space between them and others. It is thus important to follow guidance that has been set in your local state or territory, and be aware of measures implemented to limit the spread of the virus and exposure for the most vulnerable population. These may change day by day; please check them on a regular basis. If you are able to go outside, stay at least 1.5 metres away from others.

Should I do the grocery shopping instead of my parents?

Older adults and adults with health conditions should take precautions to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus. This includes limiting unnecessary exposure to other people, poorly ventilated areas, and ensuring enough space between them and others. It is thus important to follow guidance that has been set in your local state or territory, and be aware of measures implemented to limit the spread of the virus and exposure for the most vulnerable population. These may change day by day; please check them on a regular basis. If you are able to go outside, stay at least 1.5 metres from others. If possible, ensure that your parents have enough supplies on hand in case they need to stay at home, including groceries, household items and medications. Help them by taking care of their grocery shopping and avoid letting your parents handle that. Consider using home delivery services for groceries or meals, avoiding contact with the delivery staff, to ensure that your parents have a supply of nutritious food.

I have parents and/or relatives living in a care home. Should I stop visiting them?

It is important to follow guidance that has been set in your local state or territory, and care facility. Be aware of measures implemented to limit the spread of the virus and exposure for the most vulnerable population, including those set by the care home itself.These may change day by day; please check them on a regular basis. Currently there are strict measures in place across Australia and New Zealand for visiting Aged Care facilities.

My parent is taking a medical nutrition supplement. Should I pick up the products at the pharmacy so my parent can stay home?

It is important to follow guidance that has been set in your local area or state, and be aware of measures implemented to limit the spread of the virus and exposure for the most vulnerable population. These may change day by day; please check them on a regular basis. If you are able to go outside, stay at least 1.5 metres away from others. It is wise to ensure sufficient supply of medical nutrition products at home in case your parents need to stay home. You can discuss with your local pharmacy how to ensure continuity of supply over time or if it is easier you can place an online subscription order to ensure automatic and scheduled delivery at a frequency of your choice.

Medical nutrition products and tube feeding practices

Could there be COVID-19 on the products? Could my child/parents be infected due to COVID-19 on ONS/tube feeding products?

We are taking all necessary precautions and measures to ensure total product safety by applying high product safety standards and quality controls throughout the value chain, from the sourcing of our raw material and packaging to the delivery of our products.The risk of infections arising from contact with food ingredients or packaging coming from affected areas, sourced from commercial suppliers, is considered negligible as stated by all official organizations (WHO, EFSA, ECDC) and Australia and New Zealand government health departments.COVID-19 is spread predominantly from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to suggest transmission of the virus is associated with food or medical nutrition products. Before preparing/consuming/delivering ONS or tube feeding products, it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds for general food safety.

Should I wear a mask while I am caring for his/her tube feeding?

If you are sick: You should wear a face mask when you are around other people (e.g. sharing a room or vehicle, meeting a healthcare professional). If you are not able to wear a face mask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes. People who are caring for you should wear a face mask if they enter your room.If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a face mask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a face mask). For instruction on how to put on, use, take off and dispose of a mask, please click here.Remember to wash your hands thoroughly prior to handling tube feed equipment. For further advice on medical devices and consumables, such as feeding sets, please follow recommendations provided by your treating healthcare professional.

Should my child / parent wear a mask?

If they are sick: they should wear a face mask when they are around other people (e.g. sharing a room or vehicle, meeting a healthcare professional). If they are not able to wear a face mask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then they should do their best to cover their coughs and sneezes.If they are NOT sick: they do not have to wear a face mask.

Oral nutritional supplements (ONS) 

Do I need medical nutrition if I am at risk of COVID-19?

No, being at risk of COVID-19 does not mean that you need medical nutrition. Talk to your healthcare professional if you would like further advice on whether medical nutrition is appropriate for you.

Do I need medical nutrition if I have COVID-19 infection?

Medical nutrition is specially formulated for patients with a diagnosed medical condition and must be used under medical supervision. Medical nutrition is generally not needed if you have mild illness. If your symptoms are mild, follow the advice issued by the Australian Government on what to do. If in doubt, always seek medical advice. Make sure you drink plenty of fluids and eat regular meals. Ask for help from friends or family to deliver shopping or meals. Make sure you follow the precautions outlined by the Australian Government regarding contact with other people and personal hygiene to avoid spreading the virus.In most people, the illness caused by COVID-19 is generally mild but in some people, it can cause serious illness. Health experts are still learning about how COVID-19 affects people, but it appears that older people and people with pre-existing medical conditions may develop more serious illness more often than others. If you have a pre-existing medical condition that has made it difficult for you to eat and drink enough to meet your body’s needs, and you are already taking medical nutrition, you should continue to take them as recommended by your healthcare professional. If you are having problems taking your medical nutrition contact your healthcare professional for advice. Make sure you follow government advice about how to contact your healthcare professional.Medical nutrition may only be indicated if you develop a more serious illness as a result of COVID-19. Your healthcare professional will make this assessment and recommend it, if needed. If you are worried about yourself or a loved one being malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, talk to your healthcare professional.

Do I need medical nutrition when I am recovering from a COVID-19 infection?

Medical nutrition products are foods for special medical purposes specially formulated for people with diagnosed medical conditions and must be used under medical supervision.

If you are recovering from a more serious illness from a COVID-19 infection, and you have been told that you are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, then you may need medical nutrition. Your healthcare professional will recommend a medical nutrition solution if needed based on your situation.

Is medical nutrition safe for me to take if I am at risk of a COVID-19 infection?

Medical nutrition products are foods for special medical purposes that are specially formulated for people with a diagnosed medical condition and must be used under medical supervision. Based on healthcare professional advice, medical nutrition products are safe for most people to take even if they are at risk of a COVID-19 infection.If you have been given individual dietary advice because of a pre-existing medical condition by a healthcare professional, you should continue to follow that advice. If you are already taking medical nutrition products regularly, continue to take them as recommended by your healthcare professional.

Is medical nutrition safe for me to take if I have a COVID-19 infection?

Medical nutrition products are foods for special medical purposes that are specially formulated for patients with a diagnosed medical condition and must be used under medical supervision. Based on healthcare professional advice, medical nutrition products are safe for most people to take even if they have a COVID-19 infection. If you have a mild COVID-19 infection, medical nutrition is generally not needed. In more severe cases, medical nutrition can be a helpful way to support you during the acute phase by bridging the gap until your normal food intake is fully restored.If you have been given individual dietary advice because of a pre-existing medical condition by a healthcare professional, you should continue to follow that advice. If you are already taking medical nutrition, continue to take them as recommended by your healthcare professional.

Is medical nutrition safe for me to take when I am recovering after a COVID-19 infection?

Medical nutrition products are foods for special medical purposes that are specially formulated for patients with a diagnosed medical condition and must be used under medical supervision. Yes, medical nutrition is safe for you to take if you have had a COVID-19 infection and are now recovering, based on healthcare professional advice. If you have had a mild illness from COVID-19, medical nutrition products are generally not required. In more severe cases, medical nutrition can be a helpful way to support your recovery by helping you bridge the gap until your normal food intake is fully restored. If you have been given individual dietary advice because of a pre-existing medical condition by a healthcare professional, you should continue to follow that advice. If you are already taking medical nutrition, continue to take them as recommended by your healthcare professional.

Are there any special measures during this COVID-19 outbreak that I should consider with respect to the handling of medical nutrition products or devices?

Before using any medical nutrition products or devices, wash your hands thoroughly. Wet your hands with water, lather them up properly, on both sides, in between the fingers and under the nails, one hand and then the other. Rinse them thoroughly under running water for 20 seconds. Rinsing thoroughly is key to washing away any trace of the virus. Dry your hands well with a disposable towel, then use that towel to turn off the tap before throwing it away. When it is not possible to wash, use a hydroalcoholic gel containing between 60-95% alcohol.Always check the label of your medical nutrition products for instructions on how to prepare, use and store them.

Why would I need medical nutrition during this COVID-19 outbreak?

If you are unwell or recovering from illness it can be hard to get all the energy and nutrients you need from your diet alone, especially if you have a poor appetite or symptoms that make eating and/or drinking difficult (e.g. nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, a sore mouth or swallowing difficulties). This can put you at risk of disease-related malnutrition. Oral nutritional supplements are foods for special medical purposes that are specially designed to meet the nutritional needs of people with disease-related malnutrition and must be used under medical supervision. Medical nutrition can provide additional energy, protein, vitamins and minerals.

Further reading (AUS) 

Australian Government information and advice regarding COVID-19: https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert/what-you-need-to-know-about-coronavirus-covid-19State-based government information and advice regarding COVID-19:

World Health Organisation (WHO) Q&A on COVID-19: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronavirusesWHO guidance on use of masks: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masksCenters for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Further reading (NZ) 

New Zealand Government information and advice regarding COVID-19: https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-health-advice-general-publicWorld Health Organisation (WHO) Q&A on COVID-19: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronavirusesWHO guidance on use of masks: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masksCenters for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Recommendations

7 ways you can protect yourself and those around you

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Covid 19 Recommendations | Nutricia Adult Healthcare

We understand that this is a stressful time for the vulnerable, patients and their caregivers. To help you protect yourself and those around you, Nutricia is sharing a few simple rules from the World Health Organization (WHO). If you are a carer and in contact with the vulnerable or patients, it is even more important to responsibly safeguard your health and follow these recommendations – together we can limit the spread of the COVID-19.

In addition, we are sharing answers from our Nutricia experts to the most frequently asked questions about what to do if you are someone who is more vulnerable to COVID-19, currently a patient, or looking after another person. Each category has specific scenarios to help guide you and can be applied to your daily lives.

1. Wash hands regularly

COVID-19 is spread by human contact. Therefore, the best way to protect against it is to properly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. We recommend that you make it a regular routine before meal times, when coming in from outdoors and before and after meeting friends or family.

What does it mean for you? This will help to eliminate any traces of the virus that may be on your hands so that you don’t infect yourself or anyone around you. In addition, please enforce hand washing for anyone entering into the same space as you – this may include family, helpers, the postman, etc. If you are a carer, it’s very important to explain this to the person you are looking after as well.

WHO’s handwashing guidelines: https://www.who.int/gpsc/clean_hands_protection/en/

2. Keep a social distance of 1.5 metres

We all want to be near our family members or patients to comfort them during these stressful times, however, it is recommended that we minimise our visits to stop the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, please shorten or postpone visits or family gatherings to a later date.

If you are around anyone that is unwell, avoid contact and maintain a safe distance of at least 1.5 meters as the virus is carried and passed-on by people. Social distancing has been proven to reduce the spread of the virus.

What does it mean for you? This doesn’t mean you should completely avoid contact with your friends and family. Try to find other means to communicate, such as by phone or online tools such as Skype, Webex or Zoom.

3. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth

We tend to touch different surfaces throughout the day which may carry the COVID-19 virus. Once it is on our hands, the easiest way for it to enter our body is through our eyes, mouth or nose. We can’t avoid touching surfaces, but we can avoid touching our faces and limit the potential spread of the virus into our body.

That’s why it helps to have the most-touched surfaces disinfected – doorknobs, tabletops, mobile phones, remote controls, steering wheels, handrails etc. Also try and avoid touching your face, it’s not easy but can be done if you pay attention to your gestures.

What does it mean for you? Surfaces can be contaminated with COVID-19 and once the virus is on our hands it can easily be transferred into the body via our eyes, mouth or nose when we touch our face.

If you are a carer and looking after someone who doesn’t have access to this vital information, please explain to them the importance of avoiding touching your eyes, mouth and nose.

4. Practice good respiratory hygiene

Make sure you and the people around your loved one or patient all follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with a bent elbow or tissue when coughing or sneezing, then disposing of used tissues immediately.

What does it mean for you? Droplets can spread the virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect yourself and the people around you from viruses such as the cold, flu and COVID-19.

5. Feeling sick? Seek advice from your local health authority as early as possible

If you’re experiencing early signs of COVID-19, such as a fever, cough or having difficulty breathing, seek medical advice immediately. Stay away from your local medical centre, hospital or pharmacy to avoid further spread of the disease. It is best to self-isolate, call the National Coronavirus Health Information Line on 1800 020 080 and seek advice from your local public health unit.

What does it mean for you? National and local health authorities will have the most up-to-date information on the situation in your area. Contact your local public health unit and they will advise on how long you will need to be isolated. This will protect you and also help prevent further spreading of the virus. If you are a carer for another person and are noticing you are displaying symptoms of the virus, it’s better to self-isolate than risk passing it on.

6. Use good hygiene when preparing food

  • Wash your hands before handling food.
  • Use separate chopping boards for raw and cooked foods. Also wash your hands between handling raw and cooked food.
  • You don’t have to avoid meat. Just be smart and make sure all the meat is cooked thoroughly and handled properly during preparation.
  • Keep cold food cold <5°C, hot food hot >60°C
  • Keep leftovers for only 2 days in the refrigerator. Reheat to >60°C if to be served hot

What does it mean for you? Because we cook for ourselves, our family and as a carer often for our patient, COVID-19 may be spread by ingestion. Therefore, it’s even more important for the person who’s preparing the food to follow strict hygiene procedures while cooking.

7. Stay informed and follow advice

With the increase of coverage on mass media and social media, it is very important for you to be aware of the correct information on the COVID-19 outbreak and to be mindful of fake news circulating which will only increase your concerns. The most reliable and up-to-date information available is on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Seek advice from trustworthy, reliable sources for you and your loved one.

For more information, please visit: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public 

This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

Always seek the advice of a healthcare professional if you have any questions or concerns.